The Light of the Lord

“The Light of the Lord”

isa-2-5-teach-me-to-walk-in-the-light

Isaiah 2:1-5 (2:5) – November 27, 2016

At this holiday and homecoming time of the year, some people’s thoughts turn to those who are traveling. Those who will be coming to a gathering, a party, a meal. Have you been waiting for someone to arrive at a gathering? A meal, perhaps? At this time of year, the sun sets early. People often put the porch light on to welcome the traveler, in hope and expectation. That is the situation we have here, in our scripture passage from the prophet Isaiah.

And, what a grand porch light it is! Let’s read from Isaiah 2, verse 2: “In days to come the mountain of the Lord’s house shall be established as the highest of the mountains, and shall be raised above the hills; all the nations shall stream to it.”
But, what of Isaiah’s audience? What about them? Times in the nation of Judah were uncertain, to say the least. Spirits were low. The Israelites were in fear for their lives. The Assyrian armies were closing in. The nation of Assyria was a major world power in that time, conquering nations, kings, and vast areas of land right and left. (This was several centuries before Jesus Christ was even born in Bethlehem.) What about today? We can look at our times, too. A great deal of uncertainty, everywhere we look. Uncertain times here, locally, in the immediate community. On a nation-wide scale, as well. What about internationally? However—Isaiah brings a word of hope to people of his day, and hope to people of ours, too.

The prophet gives a prophetic announcement in these verses. It isn’t a hymn of praise, but instead words to let people know that God is not absent or unable to help, but instead a very present help. A hope, in times of uncertainty and need. The very promise of salvation, to not only the people of Israel, but to anyone who hears these words. We can see that from the mention of “all nations” streaming to the mountain of the Lord.

Many people in Isaiah’s time frankly doubted God’s power and faithfulness, with the Assyrians breathing down their necks. These were uncertain times, indeed. Can you imagine, a huge army right on our border, and not very much in between? Imagine the fear, anxiety, and conflict for those people of Judah! Even though, today, we here in the United States are not in such dire straits as little, puny Israel, we face uncertainty and times of conflict, too.

What does the prophet have to say about that fear, that anxiety? He brings words of hope and expectation to his listeners. Listen to verse 3: “Many peoples shall come and say, “Come, let us go up to the mountain of the Lord, to the house of the God of Jacob; that God may teach us His ways and that we may walk in God’s paths.” So, God will begin a time of learning, a time of pilgrimage! “A purposeful journey to a holy place.” [1]

Again, we see that the prophet tells us many, many people will come to God’s house! Remember, this proclamation refers to all nations, all peoples, and addresses all who have open ears to hear.

All this will occur “in days to come.” Sure, the prophet is not specific; this is an indefinite time, but there also will be a radical transformation! Listen to verse 4: “[God] shall judge between the nations, and shall arbitrate for many peoples; they shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruning hooks; nation shall not lift up sword against nation, neither shall they learn war any more.”

Can anyone read these verses and not long for peace? And not have keen hope and expectation for this coming time of peace and concord? The Lord God will sit as a judge or arbiter for many, many people. And—this is fascinating—the nations, themselves, shall willingly lay down their weapons. Many nations shall cause their weapons—their swords—to be turned into something radically different. To rephrase, “God promises that there will be a time when everyone gets along.  It will be so peaceful that people won’t need swords and other weapons anymore.  So, they will turn them into garden tools.” [2]

It does not take a brilliant student of current events to tell us that this prophecy is not here, yet. We regularly hear about wars and rumors of war today. We see for ourselves that nations are at each others’ throats, bickering, sometimes fighting, and even committing acts of mass destruction and death. What is to be done?

The prophet brings these words of hope and expectation to a fearful and anxious people, at an uncertain time centuries ago. Is the situation much different, today? Our time is filled with conflict. Fearful, anxious, and uncertain, too.

The prophet’s message holds out hope and expectation, true. But hope would be empty if we did not have a situation where we needed God’s help. We have to see our desperate need first, in order for us to realize that we are sunk without God. This whole mindset of conflict, fighting and resistance to any kind of peace certainly registers as a time of great need. The prophet was calling to the nation of Israelites just as much as he is calling to us.

“God is taking us somewhere we cannot go on our own, not because of our righteousness, but because of God’s goodness. The coming peace is God’s, but it is promised to us. And thus, like Israel, Isaiah calls us to act in the meantime as though the promise is ours.” [3]

Today is the first Sunday in Advent. We have the reminder of our hope set before us, in this Advent wreath. Today, Carl and Irene lit our first candle, the candle of hope. Yes, both scripture readings this morning spoke of expectation in the Lord’s working, in different ways. Yet, how does this work show itself?

Practically everyone here is familiar with the need for light. If we have a dark closet or a dark basement corner, bright light is so useful and needful to shine in and reveal our needs.  What about dark news? Dark times need light, too. The prophet talks about hope and expectation of nations turning tools of destruction and war into tools that will help us to grow food, and to provide nurture and healthfulness. Isn’t this a promise of light? And wonderful things to come?

Can we “compare lighting the Advent candles to putting a candle in the window?  [This is a way] of saying we are ready, you are welcome, come in. Often we turn these lights on while we are setting the table, sweeping the floor, and cooking dinner.” [4] Isn’t this a way to use common, everyday things to work with God to bring God’s light into the world?

In Christ’s kingdom, we have the opportunity to tend with everyday garden tools to cultivate and grow the peaceful, loving ways of God rather than using swords and spears—and bombs, tanks and guns—to cultivate wayward humanity’s own ways of conflict, fighting and war. Truly, may we all be faithful, anticipate God’s light and expect it in God’s peaceful ways, and not our own. Come, Lord Jesus!

 

[Thanks for several ideas to Gene M. Tucker and the The New Interpreter’s Bible Commentary (Vol. 6, The Book of Isaiah, Chapters 1-39), (Nashville, TN: Abingdon Press, 2000)]

[1] Gene M. Tucker and the The New Interpreter’s Bible Commentary (Vol. 6, The Book of Isaiah, Chapters 1-39), (Nashville, TN: Abingdon Press, 2000).

[2] http://worshipingwithchildren.blogspot.com/2013/08/year-first-sunday-of-advent-also-sunday.html ; Carolyn C. Brown, Year A – First Sunday of Advent, Also the Sunday after Thanksgiving in the USA.

[3]  http://www.workingpreacher.org/preaching.aspx?commentary_id=7

[4] http://worshipingwithchildren.blogspot.com/2013/08/year-first-sunday-of-advent-also-sunday.html ; Carolyn C. Brown, Year A – First Sunday of Advent, Also the Sunday after Thanksgiving in the USA.

 

Advertisements

With Thanksgiving

“With Thanksgiving”

phil-4-6-dont-be-anxious-pray-instead

Philippians 4:4-7 (4:6) – November 20, 2016

It’s that thankful time of the year, and this service is where we all gather to say “thank You” to God. We say thanks for all sorts of good things. Wonderful gifts. Exciting opportunities. We gladly come before God and mention how thankful each of us is—to God.

One of my favorite biblical websites (and, I fully consider her a bible commentator) is “Worshiping with Children,” written by Carolyn C. Brown. This is what she had to say about Thanksgiving: “One of my favourite times with the children was the year we learned how to say “Thank you” in many languages from our congregation, and ended by using those words for our prayer together.” [1]

Saying “thank you.” I know I taught my children how to say “thank you” when they received gifts, and compliments, and lots of other things. It’s a common thing, for grown-ups, parents, and grandparents to instruct children in these considerate, valuable, and grateful words.

Our scripture passage for the morning comes from the letter of the Apostle Paul to the church in Philippi, in the last chapter. Paul previously said what he wanted to say in the body of the letter, and this is the final few paragraphs. What we have here are closing remarks. And, what remarks! Reading verse 4:6 again: “Do not worry about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God.”

This letter Paul wrote to the Philippian church was, in part, a thank you letter. We can see how Paul weaves thankfulness and gratitude in several parts of this letter, including right here. Except—he throws in a number of last-minute recommendations and commands, too. Paul mentions worry, right up front. “Do not worry about anything.”

How can worry affect us? True, it can be so difficult to follow Paul’s advice! Everyone has something to worry about. Some people have lots of things to worry about, it seems. Let’s take a closer look, and see what the background to this advice is.

When Paul wrote this letter, he wrote it from prison in Rome. He had been sent to the emperor’s court on a capital charge. He was on trial for his life. And yet—the apostle Paul writes this joyful, thankful, gratitude-filled letter.

Let us count off difficulties and challenges that Paul faced: not only the upcoming trial—for his life, but on top of that, Paul considered himself to be responsible for many of the churches he had planted on his missionary trips in Asia Minor and throughout Greece. Such heavy burdens on Paul. Yet, here in chapter 4 we see him writing almost blithely to the Philippian believers.

When we look at the people who were on the receiving end of this correspondence, few of them were living comfortable lives. One of the commentaries I consulted said, “Many were poor, many were slaves and few of them would have known the meaning of security. In marked contrast, those of us who live in comparative wealth and luxury today are frequently those who are most worried and anxious.” [2]

Isn’t that a true description of us, today?

Sometimes there IS stuff to worry about! A lot of times, people (yes, even Christians) worry about all kinds of stuff! Aren’t we tempted to be worried and anxious when finances are a challenge or the car is giving big problems? Or, how about when we or one of our loved ones is unemployed? Or, in the hospital or dealing with a chronic illness? What about in an accident, or even in jail? Some would say it is natural, even part of the human condition to be worried.

Something to think about, certainly. Especially at this grateful, thankful time of the year when we are encouraged to count our blessings.

Let’s look at the next part of this verse, the part that comes after Paul tells us not to worry: “but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God.”

Sometimes it can be extremely difficult to pray and request with thanksgiving. Sometimes exterior circumstances can make things such a challenge for us to be thankful. There are even worse things: sometimes people can be absolutely at the end of themselves, spiritually and emotionally. Look at people like Paul, when we consider him in prison, on trial for his life.

From a commentator comes this challenging illustration about Corrie ten Boom, a devout Christian who hid and saved dozens of Jews from the Nazis: “Imagine how difficult it was to pray and worship with thanksgiving in a concentration camp in Germany. ‘Corrie ten Boon’s memory of leading forbidden worship in a World War II concentration camp might shed some light for us. Almost crushed by the effort of offering praise amidst wretched, flea-infested, frigid surroundings, they worshiped God.  Always fearful of discovery and punishment, they lifted whispered prayers of thanksgiving not only for the beloved community in that unholy place but also for the hardships they helped each other bear.

‘Months passed as their cherished worship continued uninterrupted by the usually brutal guards, offering encouragement to their battered spirits. Decades later, Corrie encountered a former prison guard who admitted he had never ventured into her barrack because he feared the overwhelming flea infestation. God was indeed in that place, utilizing every means to bless those worshipers.’” [3]

If we “don’t worry,” and do the “requesting with thanksgiving” part, what happens then?

God’s peace will then guard our hearts and minds.

Yes, it can be a challenge to make our requests, and to pray with thanksgiving. Especially when we give thanks “while staring down hatred, injustice, poverty or sadness. It may strain our faithfulness. Discerning God’s love while receiving cancer treatments, caring for a critically ill loved one or agonizing over a wayward child may challenge our belief.” [4]

Yet, we have Paul’s testimony that—even though he was locked away in prison for a capital offence—he could still write this joy-filled, thankful letter to the Philippian believers. And, Paul reminds his listeners that there is a wonderful result of laying out our cares to God. “God’s peace, which is more wonderful than anyone can imagine, will stand guard over our hearts and minds. While we are still vulnerable, we are also assured of God’s concern and protection.” [5]

What a promise. God personally grants us peace. God has promised to stand like a sentinel over our hearts and minds. Yes, things can be difficult, and challenging, even heart-wrenching,  yet Paul reminds us: be thankful.

These thankful words came from Paul, and they are for believers all over the world. It does not matter who we are; we all are encouraged to say “thank you.” It doesn’t matter where on earth people are from, or what language they speak. We all can use these words for our prayer together: Dear God, thank you for Your good gifts. Merci. Danke. Sheh-sheh. Molte grazie! In Jesus’ precious, powerful name we give thanks, amen.

[1] http://worshipingwithchildren.blogspot.com/2013/09/year-c-thanksgiving-day-october-14-2013.html

[2] Hooker, Morna D., The New Interpreter’s Bible Commentary (Vol. 12,The Letter to the Philippians), (Nashville, TN: Abingdon Press, 2000), 547-48.

[3] https://fosteringyourfaith.wordpress.com/author/econgregtnl/

[4] https://fosteringyourfaith.wordpress.com/author/econgregtnl/

[5] http://www.workingpreacher.org/preaching.aspx?commentary_id=470  Commentary, Philippians 4:4-7, Michael Joseph Brown, Preaching This Week, WorkingPreacher.org, 2009.

@chaplaineliza

(Suggestion: visit me at my regular blog for 2016: matterofprayer: A Year of Everyday Prayers. #PursuePEACE – and my other blog,  A Year of Being Kind . Thanks!)

Every Blessing in Abundance

“Every Blessing in Abundance”

2-cor-9-7-thanksgiving-word-cloud

2 Corinthians 9:7-12 (9:8) – November 13, 2016

At this thanksgiving time of the year, people are more liberal with their donations. Soon the Salvation Army kettles will be out in front of stores and supermarkets, and we will hear the ding dong of bell ringers asking for gifts. The food pantries and clothes closets appreciate extra donations, and all manner of other charities will receive additional gifts, too. The holidays are a time to give liberally to all kinds of organizations and charitable institutions.

This brings me to our Scripture passage for today. This giving time of the year reminds us of what Paul wrote to the church in Corinth. In the paragraphs before today’s reading in chapter 9, Paul asks for a collection to be gathered together. This collection of money is to be given to the persecuted, needy church in Jerusalem.

It’s then Paul tells more about giving, in general. How to give, and why. How not to give, too. People have all kinds of reasons to give: giving to provide for others, in a righteous kind of way. Giving to help others, in a loving way. Or, giving out of obligation, in a grudging way. There are many different kinds of ways to give, and attitudes to have while we contribute. The Apostle Paul talks about a few of them in this reading today.

God loves a cheerful giver. Paul says so! In the verses just before today’s passage, Paul praises the believers in Corinth for such a bountiful gift for the persecuted church in Jerusalem. So generous! They understood why the money was needed, certainly.

We have a proverb of Paul’s day included here, in our first verse: “the one who sows sparingly will also reap sparingly, and the one who sows bountifully will also reap bountifully.” Here Paul is including a common saying of the day to illustrate his point. Talking about bounty, about being generous, and about grudging giving—being stingy.

What is all this about sowing and reaping? To us, in a 21st century, urban context, most of us are not very familiar with planting and harvest, sowing and reaping illustrations. Some are—those of us who have green thumbs, plant lovely gardens, and reap a bountiful harvest. You will more easily understand what Paul is saying here.

We have it in a little different fashion, a verse later. Each of you must give as you have made up your mind, not reluctantly or under compulsion.”

Let me give an illustration. Better than that, let me show you what Paul is talking about here. I have some bookmarks with 2 Corinthians 9:7 printed on them. I will take the liberty of passing them out.

(I pass out the bookmarks, first, reluctantly. With a somber face, not looking people in the eye, sighing, rolling my eyes, and not very pleased to be giving out bookmarks at all. Halfway through, I change my demeanor. I pass out bookmarks with a cheerful smile, with a happy attitude, and wishing people the best as I give them bookmarks.)

Did anyone notice a difference? What was that difference?

Was I a reluctant giver of the bookmarks, at first? “I can’t believe I have to do this.” And “I wonder whether I can leave soon?” Rolling my eyes, and sighing. I did not show a very good attitude, at all!

How about the second half of the bookmarks? The second half of my giving? How was that? Was I a cheerful giver? Was I kind and welcoming?

How did you feel receiving the bookmark from a reluctant giver? How about the cheerful giver? Which kind of giver would you prefer? Which kind of giver do you think God prefers?

We will read this verse once more: “Each of you must give as you have made up your mind, not reluctantly or under compulsion, for God loves a cheerful giver.” These are wise words from the Apostle Paul. This giving cannot be done reluctantly, or under compulsion, because then it isn’t for real. The reluctant giving is grudging. Out of obligation, and a heavy, unpleasant responsibility.

Paul would tell us, “No! That isn’t that way God wants you to give!” Instead, we are to give in cheerfulness, with joy in our hearts. We are to give freely and positively. God will love us for that positive, cheerful attitude. What is more, the whole action and the whole feeling of the heart will then be framed by love. God’s love! God will express love toward us, and each of us will express love toward our fellow people in need. And, whomever else we need to give to.

But, wait! There is more! Paul goes on to talk about what more God will do. If we have this generous attitude towards giving, being open-handed, positive and cheerful, then God will bless us abundantly with every blessing.

You can kind of see this from the way the sentence is translated into English, but Paul is making sure his readers know that God will absolutely, abundantly provide. God will certainly multiply all with great abundance. If we have generous attitudes, God will provide every increase, so that we will abound in every good work.

Let me caution everyone here. God is not talking about purchasing salvation. That is not even being discussed. We are saved already.

We have been justified by God, and we are now and always God’s children, beloved and cherished. However—as we know from our own children, beloved children are not always cheerful and generous. That is just Paul’s point here!

God wants us to live abundant lives. God wants us to be kind and cheerful and generous. God wants us to be abundantly blessed, and have heavenly gifts rain on our heads. What is the hinge, here? Giving. If we have a kind, cheerful and generous attitude towards giving, God is essentially giving us a high five!

We will live abundant lives, blessed and enriched in every way.

What a marvelous promise. What wonderful words. And, this is not “maybe,” or “I hope so,” but it is a blessed promise from God! This is not only for our gifts of treasure, for our gifts of money. But, this blessing is for our gifts of time and of talents, as well.

For the person who comes and volunteers on Sunday mornings to start the coffee, stuff the bulletins in the hymnals, or turns on the lights in the sanctuary and lights the candles—thank you, so much. For the person who bakes a cake or makes a table decoration or repairs the church building—thank you. Those are the gifts of time and of talent, and God is so pleased with that. All of those things, and many, many more.

Paul’s final words from this reading today: “11 You will be enriched in every way for your great generosity, which will produce thanksgiving to God through us; 12 for the rendering of this ministry not only supplies the needs of the saints but also overflows with many thanksgivings to God.” See? Our cheerful, generous giving supplies the needs of the saints. The needs of the local church.

We end as we begin, with thanksgiving. Thanksgiving to our fellow church members, to our friends and neighbors, and ultimately, to God. Thanks be to God for God’s abundant blessings. And, thanks be to God for the indescribable gift of salvation.

Alleluia, amen!

(Thanks to Pam Auble and http://www.ucc.org/oghs_resources_2013-resources_activities for the excellent suggestion of a reluctant giver and a cheerful giver.)

Riches of God’s Inheritance

“Riches of God’s Inheritance”

eph-1-18-riches-of-heart-paul

Ephesians 1:1-2, 15-19 (1:18) – November 6, 2016

It’s All Saints’ Sunday! The day set apart to commemorate all the saints. Not only the living saints of today, but all the saints, all those who have ever believed in God, for all time.

Who is a saint, anyhow? We have the Apostle Paul. He is called a saint by many streams of Christian faith and tradition, and has been known as one for hundreds and hundreds of years. A powerhouse of a believer, that’s to be sure! What about St. Luke, who our church is named after? The only Gentile to author books in our Bible, and a learned man. A doctor. He certainly is lifted up as a prime example of faith in our Lord.

But that was centuries ago. Who do we lift up as saints today? Mother Theresa was just declared a saint by Pope Francis several months ago. Her example as the founder of the order the Missionaries of Charity, and her piety and good works are definitely something for all of us to emulate. What about on the Protestant side of the aisle? Some would say people like Martin Luther King Jr. ought to be lifted up, who did so much to promote the worth and position of people of color, of women and of downtrodden individuals all over the world. What about Dietrich Bonhoeffer, who steadfastly stood against the rise of the Nazi party in Germany in the 1930’s and into the 1940’s, and trained pastors secretly in a forbidden seminary. He wrote extensively about not only the Christian faith, but the fearsome menace of the Fascists in Germany against not only Christians, but against all people of conscience, all over the world.

Yes, we commemorate all of these, and many more. The Apostle Paul surely would nod his head in agreement. But, what does our scripture lesson for today have to do with all of these big names, all of these rock stars of the Christian faith? Good question! For the answer, let’s turn to the passage from Ephesians, the beginning of Paul’s letter.

Starting at verse one, chapter one: “Paul, an apostle of Christ Jesus by the will of God, To the saints who are in Ephesus and are faithful in Christ Jesus: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.”

Do you hear? Saints! Paul calls everyone who belongs to the church in Ephesus a saint. A believer, one who is faithful to Jesus.

One of the commentators I consulted says “In Paul’s understanding the title “saint” belongs to those who have been united with Christ. He routinely calls the members of his churches “saints” (Ephesians 1:1 and 1:15) because of who they are in Christ and not because of what they have accomplished. [1] (italics mine)

We take these writings in the New Testament to heart. We believe the biblical writers not only to have addressed these letters to the stated churches and people, but we consider these writings to be addressed to us, too. So—Paul is calling us saints. In Greek, it is hagioi, or holy ones, set-apart-ones. That is us, too!

Our scripture lesson today lifts up Paul’s prayer for the Ephesian believers, or saints. These are Paul’s friends. He had been pastor in Ephesus in the past for many months, and he had developed some deep, intimate relationships with some of the people there. Now far away, he writes this letter to his friends, his former congregation.

When you have deep, intimate relationships with people, and then move far away, how do you keep in touch? Today, of course, with the telephone, computer and social media, there are many ways to stay connected. But, in Paul’s day? Not so much. Besides returning to see the friend for a visit, the options were personal letters, and visits from emissaries, who might deliver a personal message to a friend or relative.

Paul really wanted to communicate some specific things. He does this in a prayer; the prayer in the passage we read today. Paul prays for the Ephesians…but, how does he pray? For what? He mentions faith! Love! Hope! Riches!

Let’s break that down. He leads off with the two most significant, and in a compliment to his friends, too! Verse 15: “I have heard of your faith in the Lord Jesus and your love toward all the saints;” that is, for all of their fellow believers in Christ. And, I think Paul is talking about the Ephesians’ love for all saints, everywhere!. That’s huge! Could someone say that about us? About this group of believers, right here at St. Luke’s Church?

I want us to pay particular attention. That compliment of Paul’s is a great example for us. To love not only believers nearby, who look like us and worship like we do on Sunday morning, but also have love for believers far away, who look and act and speak in very different ways, and may not worship in ways that are familiar, or even comfortable to our way of thinking. Certainly, something to think about.

Let’s get to the heart of this prayer (and the heart of this sermon); look at Paul’s mention of hope and riches. This is his earnest request of God: “that the God of our Lord Jesus Christ…may give you a spirit of wisdom and revelation…so that, you may know what is the hope to which God has called you, what are the riches of his glorious inheritance among the saints.”

Here is Paul’s earnest prayer for his friends in Ephesus, and by extension, earnest prayer for all of us, too! That we may be fully aware of 1) the hope of our Calling by God, and 2) the riches of God’s glorious inheritance.

Let me double check. Then, if we understand Paul correctly, we can tell that we are saints—holy people—set apart—solely because of who we are in Christ, not because of anything we have done, or how good we have been, or any other striving or good works on our part. And that is consistent with exactly what we have heard last week, in our Reformation Day sermon. We are set free—we are made holy people, hagioi, saints of God—by Jesus Christ. Not because of anything we have done, or by our puny striving, or our paltry good works. (What a marvelous tie-in to last week’s sermon!)

You may be wondering why I asked everyone to bring in photos of their loved one who have died. I wanted a visible reminder of these beloved saints, these loved ones who have gone before us, into God’s blessed presence. Paul prays that the Ephesian saints may know the riches of our glorious inheritance—which is salvation! Redemption! Adoption as God’s beloved children. Our loved ones who are now in God’s presence know those glorious riches firsthand.

In a few minutes, we will celebrate the Lord’s Supper. It is not only us gathered here who celebrate, but it is that great cloud of witnesses we spoke of, at the beginning of the service. We have our own cloud of witnesses, too, who are gathered here around the altar. Who we remember and miss and think of with fondness, and who are with us each time we gather together as a congregation in worship.

Each time we gather together at this table, we join the communion of saints—and our own cloud of witnesses to God’s glory and unbounded love. Just as they are feasting in heaven right now, around God’s own banquet table, so we feast here today. A foretaste of that banquet in heaven, and the blessed hope of the reunion to come.

Let us not forget: as the Apostle Paul reminds us, we can also celebrate the riches of our inheritance! That is, our forgiveness by Jesus Christ, our salvation and redemption in His name, and our adoption as children of God. Saints of God! That title of “saints” isn’t just for the superstars of faith, but it’s for you and me, too. To all who believe. Praise God! Amen!

 

[1] http://www.workingpreacher.org/preaching.aspx?commentary_id=1634  Ephesians 1:11-23, Mark Tranvik, All Saints C, Preaching This Week, WorkingPreacher.org, 2013.